Saturday, October 24, 2015

Wisconsin Fallout From Fukushima Radiation After Only 3 Days

The west coast of the U.S. awaits arrival of the most concentrated radioactive ocean water from the disasters at Fukushima nuclear reactors over the coming several months. However, many reports indicate that there is not much left to kill in the Pacific waters off the west coast. In that respect, the upcoming arrival of the greatest concentration of deadly man-made radioisotopes may be a sort of anti-climax. On the other hand, rainfall and other mechanisms will continue to spread the illness, mutations and death to inland territory. Those who remain on the west coast to watch the show have been called "dead men walking."

In contrast to the months and years involved in dispersion of Fukushima radiation by ocean currents, this article features a clever analysis showing airborne travel of harmful radioisotopes all the way from Fukushima, Japan, to Wisconsin, U.S., and neighboring areas in little more than three days.

This analysis by "King Cobra", posted in the Nuclear Emergency Tracking Center (NETC) forum, is alarming and perhaps has not received the attention it merits.

Fig. 1 shows five spikes in increasing Fukushima radiation emission recorded by a nearby NETC monitoring station in Japan in May, 2013. Radiation is measured in Geiger counter counts per minute (CPM). Notice that the first spike of radiation occurs on May 2.

Fig. 1: Spikes in Fukushima Radiation in May, 2013


Legend: From NETC forum.
Fig. 2 shows five spikes in radiation detected in CPM in Beloit, Wisconsin, about 3 days later.

Fig. 2: Spikes in Wisconsin Radiation in May, 2013


Legend: From NETC forum.
Comparison of Fig. 1 and 2 reveals that the number of radiation spikes and their intervals thousands of miles away in Wisconsin, U.S., almost perfectly match the timing of the spikes originally recorded near Fukushima, Japan, just about 3 days earlier. This is a remarkable demonstration of how effective the jet stream may be in dispersing a plume of deadly man-made radioisotopes from a source such as Fukushima to the U.S. heartland in a matter of only about 74 hours.

Does the reader recall the U.S. Government warning citizens to take precautions in early May, 2013? No? Well, there you have it. This is part of the mission of NETC, namely to provide some early warning of potentially harmful radiation emissions. And U.S. territory itself has a number of present and possible future sources of such radiation, having embraced the insanity of building nuclear power plants all over the place, without knowing beforehand how to eliminate the man-made radioisotopes produced, and carelessly storing radioactive waste in containers which are scheduled to start increased leakage as we speak.

Note: The author manages a radiation monitoring station in the Commonwealth of Dominica, Windward Islands, Caribbean, included on the NETC web site map, but otherwise has no formal relationship with NETC.